In Flanders Fields

Sometimes, through no choice of their own, folks from Newport have been called upon to undertake commitments that they, perhaps, never dreamed of.

For some, this meant they left Newport and never got to come home.

Here are three men, from Newport, who we pay homage and reverence; and whom we have visited to pay our respects, from home.

Private David Jones 25271 South Wales Borderers who died on 14th February 1918 age 37.

Son of the late M. and J. Jones, of Newport.

Buried at Gwalia Cemetery, Flanders, Belgium.

Lance Corporal Arthur Valentine Hourahine, 39740, 5th Battalion, South Wales Borderers who died on 6th May 1918 aged 29.

Son of Jeremiah and Mary Hourahine of 9 Corelli Street, Newport.

Nine Elms - Hourahine

Buried at Nine Elms Cemetery, Flanders, Belgium.

Private Arthur Eric Willshire (Military Medal). 39850, 5th Pioneer Battalion, South Wales Borderers who died on 8th May 1918 aged 26.

Son of W.E and F. Willshire of 48 Coldra Road, Newport.

Nine Elms - Willshire headstone

Buried at Nine Elms Cemetery, Flanders, Belgium.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.

“Ode of Remembrance”, from Laurence Binyon’s poem, “For the Fallen”

2 thoughts on “In Flanders Fields

  1. It is wonderful that you both give your time to volunteer in Belgium. When you see how young the men were, a life taken so quickly. May they all rest in peace.

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  2. Many of the (tens of) cemeteries are visible from main roads, some down lanes, others are only accessible by tracks across fields. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission tried to locate the cemeteries as close as possible to the battle position (or rather: the place of death).
    But all the cemeteries have a peacefulness about them, and a calmness, and stillness – something in very stark contrast to the realities of why these graves ended up there in the first place. The light at Gwalia is always inspiring. The trees at Nine Elms are always comforting.

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